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CC: FANNY!


In Development

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CC: FANNY!


In Development

ENSEMBLE

created and produced by Theater Reconstruction Ensemble

after Booth Tarkington and Orson Welles

conceived and directed by John Kurzynowski

 

Performers: Meg MacCaryNikolai Mishler, Marielle Young

Sound Design: Ben Gullard | Production Design: Marika Kent


SYNOPSIS

Artists copy one another, whether it be in the repetition of plots or the mimicking of styles. Copying can be viewed as a form of adaptation - one that allows for a process of transformation to take place between the product of one artistic practice into that of another. But how does this practice of copying affect the eventual adaptation? And can the copy ever be as sharply drawn as the original?

"copy"  noun \ ˈkä-pē

  • an imitation, transcript, or reproduction of an original work (such as a letter, a painting, a table, or a dress)
  • one of a series of especially mechanical reproductions of an original impression; also an individual example of such a reproduction

an excerpt from the novel The Magnificent Ambersons by Booth Tarkington:

  • Major Amberson had "made a fortune" in 1878, when other people were losing fortunes, and the magnificence of the Ambersons began then. Magnificence, like the size of a fortune, is always comparative, as even Magnificent Lorenzo may now perceive, if he has happened to haunt New York in 1916; and the Ambersons were magnificent in their day and place. Their splendour lasted throughout all the years that saw their Midland town spread and darken into a city, but reached its topmost during the period when every prosperous family with children kept a Newfoundland dog.

    In that town, in those days, all the women who wore silk or velvet knew all the other women who wore silk or velvet, and when there was a new purchase of sealskin, sick people were got to windows to see it go by. Trotters were out, in the winter afternoons, racing light sleighs on National Avenue and Tennessee Street; everybody recognized both the trotters and the drivers; and again knew them as well on summer evenings, when slim buggies whizzed by in renewals of the snow-time rivalry. For that matter, everybody knew everybody else’s family horse-and-carriage, could identify such a silhouette half a mile down the street, and thereby was sure who was going to market, or to a reception, or coming home from office or store to noon dinner or evening supper.

an excerpt from the screenplay of The Magnificent Ambersons by Orson Welles:

  • NARRATOR'S VOICE:  The magnificence of the Ambersons began in 1873.

    FADE IN on a dark screen.

    IRIS INTO: (1885) A house on a period street with a white picket fence. On the sidewalk, two ladies dressed in silk and velvet are passing three ladies dressed in silk and velvet. They greet each other.

    NARRATOR'S VOICE:  Their splendor lasted throughout all the years that saw their Midland town spread and darken into a city. In that town in those days, all the women who wore silk or velvet knew all the other women who wore silk or velvet - and everybody knew everybody else's family horse-and-carriage.

    A horse-and-carriage enters in the f.g., on right side of the screen, and as it crosses the occupants, dressed in silk and velvet, wave to the ladies on the street – and the ladies wave back to the occupants.


SUPPORT

Cc: FANNY! is currently in development at Spaceworks in Brooklyn, NY.

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HOW TO HAMLET, OR HAMLETING HAMLET


March 30 - April 14, 2017 at HERE

HOW TO HAMLET, OR HAMLETING HAMLET


March 30 - April 14, 2017 at HERE

ENSEMBLE

created and produced by Theater Reconstruction Ensemble

after William Shakespeare

conceived and directed by John Kurzynowski

 

Performers: Nathaniel Basch-Gould, Sam Corbin, Joshua William Gelb, Emily Marro

Performance Writers: John Kurzynowski and Jon Riddleberger

Producing Director: Reed Whitney

Associate Director: Lauren Swan-Potras | Sound Design: Kate Marvin and Alex Hawthorn | Production Design: Marika Kent | Production Manager: Markus Paminger | Stage Manager: Julia Levine | Sound-Op: Frank Pagliaro


SYNOPSIS

Four "audience members" are unwittingly tasked with staging Hamlet. But can they withstand the historical weight of the most well known play in the English language? As they confront their own artistic anxieties they unexpectedly conjure up the ghosts of Hamlets past, dragging themselves deeper down the rabbit hole of theatrical history. Shakespeare's words swirl around them, but are never quite within their grasp. Ultimately, their struggle gives way to a meta-theatrical meditation on the Bard's most famous work.


photos by Suzi Sadler / video by ZANNI Productions


PRESS

‘How to Hamlet, Or Hamleting Hamlet’ is another strange and clever creation from Theater Reconstruction Ensemble. One of TRE’s greatest distinctions as a New York company (in my opinion) is that they are always playing onstage. No one takes themselves too seriously; no one is concerned with looking pretty. TRE’s production offers a refreshingly original take on Hamlet, truly playing with the text and themes, rather than maintaining any sort of reverential attitude towards it. Don’t mistake this levity for lack of integrity, though. True to their name, TRE interrogates the theatrical form itself with their work.
— Culturebot
Performed with everything from gleeful buffoonery to seriously Elizabethan emoting to sheer panic, Theater Reconstruction Ensemble’s ‘How to Hamlet, or Hamleting Hamlet’ is an intense, 70-minute whirlwind that lampoons, lionizes, psychoanalyzes and rationalizes the countless thespians and academics who’ve put their stamp, for better or worse, on the circa 1600 tale of a melancholy Dane undone by poisonous acts. Just as that title character is willing to throw the kitchen sink at his vow to avenge dear old dead dad, TRE pulls out all the stops while staying mission-focused on its quest to make sense of things.
— The Villager
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RHINBECCA, NY


March 4 - 19, 2016 at The Brick

RHINBECCA, NY


March 4 - 19, 2016 at The Brick

ENSEMBLE

created and produced by Theater Reconstruction Ensemble

conceived and directed by John Kurzynowski

 

Performers: Harlan Alford, Nathaniel Basch-Gould, Sam Corbin, Emily Marro, Anastasia Olowin, Jon Riddleberger, Lauren Swan-Potras

Additional Text: Alex Kveton

Producing Director: Reed Whitney

Scenic Design: Jonathan Cottle | Sound Design: Alex Hawthorn | Lighting Design: Marika Kent | Costume Design: Joseph Wolfslau | Stage Manager: Nic Adams | Production Manager: Markus Paminger | Asst. Lighting Designer / Master Electrician: Brian Abbott | Co-Sound Designer / Sound Op: Adrianna Brannon | Assistant Director: Emma Kimball | Press Rep: David Gibbs / DARR Publicity


SYNOPSIS

At the intersection of suspense and the absurd lies Rhinbecca, NY. Population: 367. Not including the mayor. Which makes 368. You may have noticed the mayor’s house. Up on the hill. You can always point to it. You can see it from miles away. The mayor's head is a bald dome with a half skirt of white hair. He's blue collar in the community, top of the food chain. And he is missing. 

Enter Don. Don is a stranger from out. He may or may not remember who he is or how he's arrived in town. And his sudden appearance may or may not be directly related to the mystery of the missing mayor. But his absurdly suspenseful quest to uncover the truth hidden beneath this theatrical facade, loosely inspired by the greatest works of playwright Eugene Ionesco and filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock, may very well leave us all completely transformed.


photos by Suzi Sadler / video by ZANNI Productions


press

The windmills of logic turned on all levels, from juxtaposing styles of speech, to varying tempo and patterns of movement, to upending notions of linear narrative. Director John Kurynowski, who also conceived the show, wrote in his program note that he wanted ‘to create a show that could walk the very fine line between suspense and the absurd.’ In a you-have-to-see-it-to-believe-it kind of way, ‘Rhinbecca, NY’ is a magnificent tightrope walk between the two.
— Culturebot
 
‘Rhinbecca, NY’ is a play deeply concerned with terror and fear, and how human beings manifest terror and fear. The world Don stumbles into is full of existential dread. The more the people smile, the worse it gets. Every dance break (there are a few) is fun but also pulsates with some sort of primal violence. Or maybe it doesn’t. Maybe it’s all in our heads. ‘Rhinbecca, NY’ is too shrewd to make that decision for us.
— New York Theatre Review
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SALESMEN


October 24 - November 9, 2013 at HERE

SALESMEN


October 24 - November 9, 2013 at HERE

ENSEMBLE

created and produced by Theater Reconstruction Ensemble

conceived and directed by John Kurzynowski

 

Performers: Michael Barringer, Hunter Canning, Jonathan Gordon, Eben Hoffer, Patrick Scheid, Nick Smerkanich, Hugh Trimble, Merlin Whitehawk

Producing Director: Reed Whitney

Associate Director: Lauren Swan-Potras | Sound Design: Eben Hoffer and John Kurzynowski | Lighting Design: Jonathan Cottle | Production Design: Aaron Ethan Green | Stage Manager: Sarah Lurie | Press Rep: Off Off PR / Paul Siebold


SYNOPSIS

In the early years of the American drama, the forefathers of kitchen-sink realism were seeking to create a new form of storytelling in which characters and plot lines could be plucked from the everyday humdrum of American life. Tired of the melodramatic flare, these artists were working together to rebel against the status quo by experimenting with the unknown and reveling in the process of development and discovery. More than half a century later, eight "salesmen" are tasked with creating their own unique form of theatrical storytelling by examining their forefathers' greatest works and challenging their methods. By looking to the past, they stumble forward into a new reality - a patchwork of style, drama, realism and what lies beyond - rebelling against the rules of "playwriting" as they've come to define them.


photos by Suzi Sadler / video by Michael Barringer


press

John Kurzynowski’s ‘Salesmen’ is a modern experimental form simultaneously honoring its forefathers and breaking their rules at every turn. What results is a fresh, bold production from a voice that clearly has much to say. The young Theater Reconstruction Ensemble is one to watch.
— Show Business Weekly
 
‘Salesmen’ is an experimental wonderland. The performers are fearless in their explorations of the theatre space and even time itself. If you like work that challenges the boundaries of theatre and explores historical influences on contemporary theatrical attitudes then ‘Salesmen’ is for you.
— Theatre Is Easy